On the Celestial and Supernal Orders

A text in an unknown script from before the Sundering

Category:
book/scroll
Description:

The book is priceless, a relic from before the Sundering and the coming of Izrador into the world.

Bio:

It is a book written long ago (the date is based on the reign of a king whose name is lost to history) concerning celestial, or supernal, beings and creatures then believed to exist. They were understood to intervene in mortal affairs, even providing magical assistance.

The author seems to be a Caransil Elf, Tesserel; an astrologer, philosopher and theologian who studied and wrote in a place named, in translation, “Cold-Clear-Heart-Water Observatory”.

One of the things that the text lays out is what it refers to as the Chain of Being, which is approximately as follows:

Deities
Demigods and Greater Spirits
Aeons
Angels, Archons, Azata
Divine Heralds
Agatheons
Lesser Spirits


The barrier between the spiritual and material worlds***

Dragons
Elementals
Mortals (Fey, Humankind)
Humanoids (Giants, Goblinkind, Ogres, Trolls)
Animals
Constructs
Plants
The Inanimate World

(The book mentions a sister-text which deals with the Infernal and Demonic Orders)

A number of Deities are listed in the text, one of which is indeed a word that Verrick will read as Izrador. Izrador was a jealous “winter king” who would seek to kill and silence all the world with the turning of each arc (the word for a year on Aryth), who had to be overcome by the sun-child’s coming.

Demigods were beings who each served the major deities but had a limited portfolio, as it were.

Aeons were enigmatic forces, or possibly beings, that traveled the Supernal realms to maintain their order.

Angels, Archons and Azata are servants of the benevolent gods who reside in their various realms. They are able to cross the barrier of life and death and manifest in the material world directly, something that if the higher beings did would likely break the world.

Divine Heralds are specific servants to each of the Deities.

Agatheons are to animals what Angels, Archons and Azata are to mortals. They are supernal beings that take the forms of animals, and care little for the joy and grief of the mortal world.

Lesser Spirits reside in natural elements and formations, but to the author they are considered, like the Agatheons, “pagan” – which seems to mean beneath his consideration.


There are descriptions of incantations and modes of honoring the various celestial powers throughout the book, listed as one might write up an ethnography.


The book has, in it’s appendices, notes on Discerning the Divine Will – it amounts to modes of divination used by people in the past, including astrology, augury, numerology and oneiromancy.

On the Celestial and Supernal Orders

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